Purchase Orders over £5000

Purchase Orders for £5000 or over

As part of our commitment to providing financial transparency, Worcester City Council will publish Purchase Orders with a value of £5000 and over on our website.

The reports listed below are in 'pdf' format for general viewing and in machine readable 'csv' format, and are made available under the Open Government Licence.

The council is committed to providing information in accordance with national guidelines.

Payment Period CSV PDF
2016-2017 Quarter 2 2016-2017 Quarter 2 CSV 2016-2017 Quarter 2 PDF
2016-2017 Quarter 1 2016-2017 Quarter 1 CSV 2016-2017 Quarter 1 PDF
2015-2016 Quarter 4 2015-2016 Quarter 4 CSV 2015-2016 Quarter 4 PDF
2015-2016 Quarter 3 2015-2016 Quarter 3 CSV 2015-2016 Quarter 3 PDF
2015-2016 Quarter 2 2015-2016 Quarter 2 CSV 2015-2016 Quarter 2 PDF
2015-2016 Quarter 1 2015-2016 Quarter 1 CSV 2015-2016 Quarter 1 PDF
2014 - 2015 2014-2015 Purchase Order CSV 2014-2015 Purchase Order PDF

 

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Council: Supplier Payments over £250

Supplier Payments over £250

As part of our commitment to providing financial transparency, Worcester City Council will publish individual payments to suppliers with a value of £250 (previously £500) and over on our website.

The reports listed below are in month order, in 'pdf' format for general viewing and in machine readable 'csv' format, and are made available under the Open Government Licence.

The council is committed to providing information in accordance with national guidelines. The process is being reviewed and improved for future datasets. If you have any queries, please contact us using our enquiry form for payments over £250.

Payment Period

CSV

PDF

April 2012

Payments April 2012.csv

Payments April 2012.pdf

May 2012

Payments May 2012.csv

Payments May 2012.pdf

June 2012

Payments June 2012.csv

Payments June 2012.pdf

July 2012

Payments July 2012.csv

Payments July 2012.pdf

August 2012

Payments August 2012.csv

Payments August 2012.pdf

September 2012

Payments September 2012.csv

Payments September 2012.pdf

October 2012

Payments October 2012.csv

Payments October 2012.pdf

November 2012

Payments November 2012.csv

Payments November 2012.pdf

December 2012

Payments December 2012.csv

Payments December 2012.pdf

January 2013

Payments January 2013.csv

Payments January 2013.pdf

February 2013

Payments February 2013.csv

Payments February 2013.pdf

March 2013

Payments March 2013.csv

Payments March 2013.pdf

April 2013

Payments April 2013.csv

Payments April 2013.pdf

May 2013

Payments May 2013.csv

Payments May 2013.pdf

June 2013

Payments June 2013.csv

Payments June 2013.pdf

July 2013

Payments July 2013.csv

Payments July 2013.pdf

August 2013

Payments August 2013.csv

Payments August 2013.pdf

September 2013

Payments September 2013.csv

Payments September.pdf

October 2013

Payments October 2013.csv

Payments October 2013.pdf

November 2013

Payments November 2013.csv

Payments November 2013.pdf

December 2013

Payments December 2013.csv

Payments December 2013.pdf

January 2014

Payments January 2014.csv

Payments January 2014.pdf

February 2014

Payments February 2014.csv

Payments February 2014.pdf

March 2014 Payments March 2014.csv Payments March 2014.pdf
April 2014 Payments April 2014.csv Payments April 2014.pdf
May 2014 Payments May 2014.csv Payments May 2014.pdf
June 2014 Payments June 2014.csv Payments June 2014.pdf
July 2014 Payments July 2014.csv Payments July 2014.pdf
August 2014 Payments August 2014.csv Payments August 2014.pdf
September 2014 Payments September 2014.csv Payments September 2014.pdf
October 2014 Payments October 2014.csv Payments October 2014.pdf
November 2014 Payments November 2014.csv Payments November 2014.pdf
December 2014 Payments December 2014.csv Payments December 2014.pdf
January 2015 Payments January 2015.csv Payments January 2015.pdf
February 2015 Payments February 2015.csv Payments February 2015.pdf
March 2015 Payments March 2015.csv Payments March 2015.pdf
April 2015 Payments April 2015.csv Payments April 2015.pdf
May 2015 Payments May 2015.csv Payments May 2015.pdf
June 2015 Payments June 2015.csv Payments June 2015.pdf
July 2015 Payments July 2015.csv Payments July 2015.pdf
August 2015 Payments August 2015.csv Payments August 2015.pdf
September 2015 Payments September 2015.csv Payments September 2015.pdf
October 2015 Payments October 2015.csv Payments October 2015.pdf
November 2015 Payments November 2015.csv Payments November 2015.pdf
December 2015 Payments December 2015.csv Payments December 2015.pdf
January 2016 Payments January 2016.csv Payments January 2016.pdf
February 2016 Payments February 2016.csv Payments February 2016.pdf
March 2016 Payments March 2016.csv Payments March 2016.pdf
April 2016 Payments April 2016.csv Payments April 2016.pdf
May 2016 Payments May 2016.csv Payments May 2016.pdf
June 2016 Payments June 2016.csv Payments June 2016.pdf
July 2016 Payments July 2016.csv Payments July 2016.pdf
August 2016 Payments August 2016.csv Payments August 2016.pdf
September 2016 Payments September 2016.csv Payments September 2016.pdf

 

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Health and Well-being

Health and Well-being

Worcester city council  and  partners from community ,private and voluntary sectors are working together to improve the health and wellbeing of the people of Worcester  in accordance with the local needs and priorities set out in the Worcester City Health and Well-being Plan.

If you would like to find information about how we can help you to choose a healthier lifestyle please visit the Worcestershire County Council Public Health website .This contains information on:

  • Stopping Smoking
  • Healthy Eating
  • Safe drinking levels
  • Increasing levels of physical activity
  • Mental Well-being

Health Walks

A health walk is a short walk which is led by a trained walk leader. There are a number of walks which take place in Worcester City, and across Worcestershire all of which differ in distance and difficulty.

Details of the available walks

For more information contact the health walks officer on 01905 768289 or by email healthwalks@worcestershire.gov.uk

If you are a keen walker and interested in taking part in longer walks please visit the Worcester Ramblers website.

Newsletters

 

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Council and Democracy - Political Structure

Your City Councillors

Political Structure

Councillors are elected by local people to represent their community. Either two or three local city councillors are elected from each of the 15 areas of the city, or 'wards'. They work together to decide the council's priorities and how it should carry out its work. They also work to make sure that council services are delivered to you in the most efficient and effective way possible.

There are 35 councillors in total. Each one is elected for a term of four years. Elections are run by the Electoral Services team based at the Guildhall. The councillors you choose to represent you give up a lot of their time to serve the community, and most are paid a basic allowance of £3,990 a year.

The political makeup of Worcester City Council

Party

Number of seats

Conservative Party

17

Labour Party

16

Green Party

2

Current Worcester City Councillors

Find details on the current Councillors and wards which they serve.

If you are not sure which ward you live in please call the council on 01905 722006 or 01905 722085 or e-mail: committeeadministation@worcester.gov.uk

The Cabinet

The Council's Cabinet are responsible for ensuring that tasks and targets made in the year's performance plan are implemented. They are primarily supported in achieving this by the Council's Managing Director and Corporate Management Team.

Cabinet Members

Title

Leader of the Council

Name

Councillor Adrian Gregson

Councillor Adrian Gregson

Title

Deputy Leader of the Council and Portfolio Holder for Performance and Resouces

Name

Councillor Joy Squires

Cllr Joy Squires

Title

Portfolio Holder for Housing and Heritage

Name

Councillor Roger Berry

Cllr Roger Berry

 

Title

Portfolio Holder for Clean, Green & Leisure Services

Name

Councillor Jabba Riaz

Councillor Jabba Riaz

Title

Portfolio Holder for Sustainable Communities

Name

Councillor Lyn Denham

Cllr Lyn Denham

Title

Portfolio Holder for Economic Prosperity and Growth

Name

Councillor Geoffrey Williams
Cllr Geofrey Williams

The Mayor of Worcester

The Mayor is the Civic Head of the Council. In May of each year, one of the Councillors is elected to serve as Mayor for one year and another elected as a Deputy. He/she chairs meetings of the Full Council and represents the city at ceremonial occasions. The Mayor also welcomes international visitors and attends events organised by local people.

The Mayor for 2016/2017 is: Cllr Paul Denham

The Deputy Mayor for 2016/2017 is: Cllr Steve Mackay

Your vote: make it count

If you want to play your part in the future of Worcester, then use your vote. By taking the time to vote in local elections, you can make sure that your voice is heard. The elected councillor will be the voice of your local community for the coming four years - so make sure you have your say.

To be eligible to vote in any elections you must be over 18 and your name must be on the Electoral Register which is updated annually. To enter your name you must complete the registration form which is sent to your home each year.

For more details on the electoral register please call Di Thomas on 01905 722027 or e-mail electoralservices@worcester.gov.uk

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Housing-Worcestershire Homelessness Strategy

Worcestershire Homelessness Strategy News

On this page you will find information and news on what is being done to tackle homelessness across Worcestershire.

Worcestershire Joint Homelessness Strategy 2012-17

The Worcestershire Homelessness Strategy 2012-2017 is the second countywide homelessness strategy. This strategy has been developed in consultation with service users and key stakeholders to steer homelessness services and support within the county over the next five years through a changing policy environment and challenging economic climate.

Early intervention and prevention of homelessness is the overriding focus of all six district councils in Worcestershire. The new strategy sets out how we and our partners will work together to prevent homelessness, tackle the root causes of homelessness and provide holistic outcomes for people who are homeless or are at risk of homelessness.

Please click here to view the strategy in full.

The County Homelessness Implementation Group (CHIG) is the group that will carry out the actions of this strategy and ensure appropriate involvement of key partners. This group is a partnership between the six Worcestershire Housing Authorities (Bromsgrove District and Redditch Borough Councils, Malvern Hills District Council, Worcester City Council, Wychavon District Council and Wyre Forest District Council) as well as Worcestershire County Council, Bromsgrove District Housing Trust, Festival Housing Group and Wyre Forest Community Housing.

An event focusing on the launch of the strategy was held on Friday 26th April 2013. The presentations given at the event can be found here:

 

Worcestershire Homeless Strategy Newsletters

Four times a year, the County Homelessness Strategy Co-ordinator produces a newsletter to provide information and news for organisations and individuals up to date with what is being done to tackle homelessness. To be added to the newsletter mailing list, please email us with your contact details.

Previous issues of the newsletter can be found here:

Worcestershire Night Assessment Centre 2011/12

Each year during the coldest winter months, the county operates a Night Assessment Centre (NAC) that provides single homeless people with a safe and warn place to stay whilst they are assisted with finding accommodation and support. For the second year running the NAC is hosted by Worcester YMCA and as in previous years is managed by St. Paul's. The NAC will run for a sixteen week (112 nights) period from Monday 26th November 2012 to Sunday 17th March 2013.

The performance report for this year is soon to be published and will be available from this page in the near future.

Homelessness Advisor Update

From the end of March 2013, the Department of Communities and Local Government (DCLG), will no longer fund or centrally co-ordinate a team of Homelessness Advisors.

Support will be available for local authorities through the National Homelessness Advice Services (NHAS) and Homeless Link, both funded by DCLG. The DCLG will also fund a national, sector led, peer review scheme on homelessness. More details of the scheme will follow.

West Midlands Regional Homelessness Forum

The West Midlands Homelessness Forum is a multi-agency forum that has a number of key tasks:

  • Supporting sub-regional activity on homelessness
  • Promoting partnership working across the region and sub-regions
  • Informing practice across the region
  • Promoting prevention of homelessness across the region

The Forum has members from a wide range of agencies and organisations ranging from:

  • Local Authority Homelessness Leads
  • Local Authority Supporting People Leads
  • Housing Providers
  • Third sector Homelessness organisations
  • National Housing Federation
  • DCLG
  • Homes and Communities Agency
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Sustainability-Sustainable Homes

Sustainable Homes

Making your home more energy efficient is one way in which you can reduce your carbon footprint, and save money on your fuel bills at the same time. Insulating homes can make them much more comfortable to live in.

Warmer Worcestershire

Warmer WorcestershireCall the Warmer Worcestershire helpline to find out if you can reduce your fuel bills - 0800 988 2881 or 01789 842 898.

The Warmer Worcestershire Programme will give you advice and help in how to improve the energy efficiency of your home and what grants or finance options are available. The Green Deal, a new initiative, provides the opportunity to pay nothing or small amounts upfront for improvements with the majority of the costs being paid back as you save money on your energy bills. Energy saving improvements include insulation, heating, draught-proofing, double glazing and some renewable energy technologies.

If you want to get an idea of how efficient your home is, then take a look at the Heat Map of Worcestershire. This maps each house in Worcestershire, and the colour of your house gives an indication of how good your insulation is. If your house appears red then loft or cavity wall insulation will reduce the heat that your house loses. The map was produced during a night time ‘flyover' and so if you were out that night, may not be accurate.

Improvements to your home

If you want to take up the Green Deal, here's what you need to do.

  1. Get an assessment of your property to see what improvements you can make and how much you could save on your energy bills.
  2. Choose a Green Deal provider to carry out the work. You discuss with them what work you want done and whether the Green Deal is right for you.
  3. If you go ahead with the improvements you must sign a Green Deal Plan. This is a contract between you and the provider stating what work will be done and how much it will cost. The provider will then arrange for a Green Deal installer to do the work.
  4. Once the work is done, you pay off the money in instalments through your electricity bill.

If you're a landlord, you must get your tenant's permission before you sign up. If you're a tenant, you must get your landlord's permission to sign up; this also applies to social housing.

To access impartial advice on the Green Deal, contact local organisation, Act on Energy on 0800 988 2881 or 01789 842 898.

Grants

Some householders in older properties and those on benefits or low incomes may qualify for extra financial assistance through the Energy Companies Obligation (ECO). This is a new scheme, funded by energy suppliers, to help reduce Britain's energy consumption.

To find out if you are eligible contact Act on Energy on 0800 988 2881.

Energy saving tips and advice

Check out our energy saving tips (from the Energy Saving Trust) to help you get a grip on your energy bills and your carbon footprint. Monitoring and evaluating your energy use is always important, and with energy bills rising quite steeply, there's now more incentive than ever.

Renewable energy installations

The Feed-in Tariffs are a Government initiative to increase the take-up of renewable energy installations on residential and commercial buildings. If you are thinking of installing a source of renewable energy on your building, such as photovoltatic (solar) cells or wind turbines, then check out our planning advice pages on renewable energy.

Act on Energy

Act on Energy

Act on Energy is a ‘not for profit' organisation and a registered environmental charity, providing free and impartial advice to householders and small businesses in Warwickshire, Worcestershire and Coventry and surrounding areas. We want to help you make your home use less energy, have lower fuel bills, be more comfortable and have less of an adverse impact on the environment.

To contact Act on Energy, visit their website at www.actonenergy.org.uk or phone 01789 842 898.

How your business could benefit

If your business is involved in supplying and installing energy saving products you can get involved in the Green Deal.

Landlords and Rented Accommodation

If you are a landlord, then there is a wealth of information available. We'd suggest that you start with the Energy Saving Trust website.

More information

For free and impartial advice about the Green Deal and ECO:

  • Visit www.gov.uk/greendeal
  • Call Act on Energy on 0800 988 2881 or 01789 842 898
  • Call the Energy Saving Advice Service on 0300 123 1234
  • Read the quick guides for households, businesses, tenants and landlords.
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Housing-Home Choice Plus

Home Choice Plus

How to Apply for Social Housing

Home Choice Plus has been developed by a number of Local Authorities and Housing Associations working in partnership. This is a way of looking for and allocating affordable housing and other options such as private rents and intermediate rents across the Local Authority areas.

Home Choice Plus House Home Choice Plus

 

Home Choice Plus

How do I register for the scheme?

You will need to fill in a housing application form to register. You can pick one up of these forms from the organizations listed below or you can fill in a form on line or download a form at homechoiceplus.org.uk .

 You will be given a registration number and your application will be placed into a band, based on your housing need and local connections.

 Once you have been notified of your registration number and banding you will be able to bid for properties. 

How do I find out when properties are available?

 Vacant properties will be advertised each week by Home Choice Plus .You will find them advertised by the organizations listed below, on homechoiceplus.org.uk  or by calling the Property Lines for a recorded message.

 How do I make a bid?

You can bid for properties in a number of ways. You will need to have ready your registration number, date of birth and the property reference number(s) you wish to bid on.  

  • By Telephone using the automated bidding line 0845 270 0557
  • By Texting using your mobile phone to: 07781 486 644 Giving your registration date (e.g. 12345)  space date of birth (e.g.16/03/1975) space property reference number (e.g.336699)

If you wish to add a second or third bid your text should look like this: 

12345 16/0/1975 336699 445566 554433

A reply is automated to your inbox, to

a) confirm you are eligible for the property

b) confirm that your bid has been accepted

c) your current bidding position

  • DigiTV (Wychavon area only) – for Sky users Press the Interactive button /Select TV Keys from the menu /Enter 9988   with the remote control
  • In person at any of the partners' offices listed above.

When can I bid for a property?

Vacant properties will be advertised each Tuesday morning. You can bid until 12pm, midnight the following Monday. This is called the weekly bidding cycle.

How many properties can I bid for?

You can make up to 3 bids each week as long as you match what the adverts asks for.

Bids must be on separate properties for which you are eligible.

If you change your mind, you can withdraw a bid and re-bid on a different property at any time throughout the bidding cycle.

Are there any other reasons I may not be able to bid?

You may not be able to bid for properties, if you do not match the criteria the adverts asks for (e.g. If you on a 2 bed property and you do not have children you do not match the criteria so will not be offered the property) 

I am a Housing Association Tenant, can I bid for properties?

If you are an existing Housing Association tenant, within the Home Choice Plus areas and are seeking a move, you will need to register with Home Choice Plus.

How quickly will I be housed?

This will depend on your housing need, the availability of the types of properties you need and also the area(s) you are considering.

You will have longer to wait for the more popular properties or areas.

If you do not bid for properties you cannot be considered for them , so it is important to be active in the Home Choice Plus scheme.

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Street care - Potholes

Potholes

Potholes are a hazard that can cause road traffic accidents. Potholes should be detected and remedied through regular roadway inspection routines. If the pothole cannot be filled immediately, motorists should be warned of the hazard by appropriate traffic signs.

With hundreds of miles of roads, cycleways and footpaths in the City, it is not possible for Worcestershire County Council to inspect all of the network all of the time. You can help us by reporting any pothole problems you see and we will endeavour to get them repaired as soon as possible.

Report a pothole in the City.

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Community Safety-Safer Worcester

Safer Worcester

Safer Worcester

The Safer Worcester Partnership is a multi agency community safety partnership committed to reducing the incidents of crime and anti-social behaviour in Worcester City, making Worcester a better place to live, work and visit.

Partners include:

As well as a variety of further public, private and voluntary groups

Safer Worcester is part of the South Worcestershire Community Safety Partnership and works towards the four strategic aims adopted by this partnership;

  • Reduce Crime
  • Provide Reassurance
  • Tackle anti-social Behaviour and Disorder
  • Reduce the Harm Caused by Drugs and Alcohol
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Community Development: Areas of highest need

Areas of Highest Need

Worcester City Council is working with partner agencies to make sustainable improvements to the quality of life for residents living in the wards of Warndon, Gorse Hill and Rainbow Hill that have been identified as communities in most need of support.

Introduction to Our Happy Place programme

The Our Happy Place programme is one of six Areas of Highest Need programmes for Worcestershire.

Worcestershire Partnership allocated funding to Worcester City Council to address long term inequalities that exist in the wards of Warndon, Gorse Hill and Rainbow Hill. The Worcestershire Partnership is the accountable body for the Our Happy Place programme, and monitors against agreed outcomes.

Two local students from the University of Worcester, Ryan Mobberley and Connor Woodley, volunteered to use their skills and expertise to create a short film which shows how some members of the local community feel about their neighbourhood and their involvement in the Our Happy Place Project.

Our Happy Place ward profiles

Indices of deprivation are published by Central Government to identify the most disadvantaged areas, so that resources and funding are allocated appropriately. The ward of Warndon, Gorsehill and Rainbow Hill are regarded as the some of the most deprived areas in Worcester city (The English Indices of Deprivation, 2007). Acorn classifications reveal three super output areas (LSOAs) within these three wards which have substantial deprivation in relation to the rest of the city.  These three LSOAs fall within the 10% most deprived areas in the county.

Areas of highest Need ward boundaries

Our local priorities

  1. Supports activities that increase sharing information, resident engagement and involvement in the local priorities.
  2. Supports better outcomes for young people
  3. Supports better outcomes for families
  4. Supports action around smoking cessation
  5. Supports people into learning, training, skills and employment
  6. Supports increasing financial inclusion for people
  7. Supports improving the local environment
  8. Supports helping people feel safer

Our performance measures

Each of our local priorities have key performance measures to assess the impact of work delivered, and sets of lower level contributory measures or intermediate measures attached to them. A resident ‘Viewpoint' Survey, which focuses on the programme area of benefit is scheduled annually for the duration of the project, which will provide a wider range of useful information against which improvements can be measured.

Further information

Please contact Francesca Davies on 01905 721131 or email francesca.davies@worcester.gov.uk

Our Happy Place Annual Report 

Our Happy Place Five Year Progress Report

What's on guide

What's on in your local area in Warndon, Tolladine, Gorse Hill Brickfields.

What's on Guide Summer 2016

Areas of significance

Background

Our Happy Place programme targets a total population of 16,620. This is made up of Rainbow Hill ward with a total population of 5977, Warndon ward with 5634, and Gorse Hill with 5009.

Income

62.3% of the population in Gorse Hill, 59.5% of the population in Rainbow Hill and 65.1% of the population in Warndon are identified as "Hard Pressed". This compares to 16.1% in Worcestershire.

In Warndon the proportion of households earning less than £10,000 a year is 19%, in Worcestershire it is 11%. The average household income in Warndon is £25465, in contrast the average is £37370 in Worcestershire, and £36,000 in England.

In Gorse Hill the proportion of households earning less than £10,000 a year is 19%, in Worcestershire it is 11%. The average household income in Gorse Hill is £25112, in contrast the average is £37370 in Worcestershire, and £36,000 in England.

In Rainbow Hill the proportion of households earning less than £10,000 a year is 15%, in Worcestershire it is 11%. The average household income in Rainbow Hill is £29407, in contrast the average is £37370 in Worcestershire, and £36,000 in England.

Education, skills and qualifications

The target area has very low skills and qualifications, with many residents having no academic, vocational or professional qualifications. There are also many young people who are identified as  "not in, education, employment or training" (NEET).

The proportion of residents aged between 16 - 74 years with no qualifications in Warndon is 42.1%. This compares with a Worcestershire average of 28.1% and and average across England of 28.9%.In Warndon 7.5% of residents aged between 16 - 74 years have achieved qualification Level 4/5. This compares to a Worcestershire average of 19.3%, and an England average of 19.9%.

The proportion of residents aged between 16 - 74 years with no qualifications in Gorse Hill is 49.3%. This compares with a Worcestershire average of 28.1% and average across England of 28.9%.In Gorse Hill 6.7% of residents aged between 16 - 74 years have achieved qualification Level 4/5. This compares to a Worcestershire average of 19.3%, and an England average of 19.9%.

The proportion of residents aged between 16 - 74 years with no qualifications in Rainbow Hill is 42.1%. This compares with a Worcestershire average of 28.1% and an average across England of 28.9%.In Rainbow Hill 12.3% of residents aged between 16 - 74 years have achieved qualification Level 4/5. This compares to a Worcestershire average of 19.3%, and an England average of 19.9%.

Health

These three wards of Worcester has significant health issues. The LSOA for Warndon is ranked in the top 10% nationally for health deprivation, and the top 20% in LSOAs in Gorse Hill and Rainbow Hill. Men from Worcester's most affluent areas can expect to live 9 years longer than those in Warndon, Gorse Hill and Rainbow Hill, whilst women can expect to live 5 years longer. Smoking is a major contributing factor to early death rates as this this target area has the highest smoking rate in the county (40.8%, compared to 25.7% in Worcestershire as a whole).

According to the 2001 Census 19.2% of people in Warndon suffer from a Limiting Long-term Illness, compared to 16.7% in Worcestershire and 17.3% in England. 10.7% of people in Warndon defined their health as "not good". This compares to average figures of 8.0% for  Worcestershire, and 8.8% in England. Within Warndon 20.7% of the population are classified as 'Healthy' compared with 37.6% of Worcestershire's population. The proportion of the population in Warndon with 'Existing Problems' is 11.8% and 57.8% of the population is classified as having 'Future Problems'.

20.1% of people in Gorse Hill suffer from a Limiting Long-term Illness, compared to 16.7% in Worcestershire and 17.3% in England. 10.6% of people in Gorse Hill defined their health as "not good". This compares to average figures of 8.0% for Worcestershire, and 8.8% in England. Within Gorse Hill 9.1% of the population are classified as 'Healthy' compared with 37.6% of Worcestershire's population. The proportion of the population in Gorse Hill with 'Existing Problems' is 38.6% and 34.7% of the population is classified as having 'Future Problems'.

17.1% of people in Rainbow Hill suffer from a Limiting Long-term Illness, compared to 16.7% in Worcestershire and 17.3% in England. 9.4% of people in Rainbow Hill defined their health as "not good". This compares to average figures of 8.0% for Worcestershire, and 8.8% in England. Within Rainbow Hill 24.6% of the population are classified as 'Healthy' compared with 37.6% of Worcestershire's population. The proportion of the population in Rainbow Hill with 'Existing Problems' is 25.4% and 35.8% of the population is classified as having 'Future Problems'.

Young people

In Worcester 3,600 children are living in poverty and 1,489 of those are in the wards of Warndon, Gorse Hill and Rainbow Hill. Children are classed as in poverty if their household's income is below about £15,000 as families struggle to meet basic needs such as food, heating, transport, clothing, school equipment and trips.

Crime and community safety

The Worcestershire Viewpoint Survey 2012 shows that 77% of local people surveyed felt safe in their local area during the day, but only 32% felt safe after dark. The target area has the highest number of reported crimes in the city (as recorded 2012), and significantly high levels of anti-social behaviour.

In Warndon there were 741 crimes recorded during 2011/12, a rate of 33.940 per 1000 population. This compares to a total of 35524 criminal offences recorded in Worcestershire, a rate of 16.970. There were 685 Anti Social Behaviour incidents recorded during 2011/12 in Warndon.

In Gorse Hill there were 480 crimes recorded during 2011/12, a rate of 23.340 per 1000 population. This compares to a total of 35524 criminal offences recorded in Worcestershire, a rate of 16.970. There were 529 Anti Social Behaviour incidents recorded during 2011/12 in Gorse Hill.

In Rainbow Hill there were 432 crimes recorded during 2011/12, a rate of 16.130 per 1000 population. This compares to a total of 35524 criminal offences recorded in Worcestershire, a rate of 16.970. There were 401 Anti Social Behaviour incidents recorded during 2011/12 in Rainbow Hill.

Domestic abuse is a concern for many services and residents. West Mercia Police record a range of domestic violence related incidents. During 2010/11, a total of 555 calls were made to the police relating to domestic violence from the target area, which is nearly 30% of all domestic violence calls for Worcester City. 15% of these were from Warndon, 10% were from Gorse Hill and 3% were from Tolladine LSOAs.

Our partners

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