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400 saplings planted as part of Worcester Charter 400

Revd Rosie Moss, Curate of St Nicholas's Chuch; Adrian Gregson, Charter 400 Project Manager; Cllr Stephen Hodgson, Mayor of Worcester; and Revd Diane Cooksey, Vicar of St Nicholas' Church pose by a 400-year-old oak at Perdswell Revd Rosie Moss, Curate of St Nicholas's Chuch; Adrian Gregson, Charter 400 Project Manager; Cllr Stephen Hodgson, Mayor of Worcester; and Revd Diane Cooksey, Vicar of St Nicholas' Church pose by a 400-year-old oak at Perdswell
On Thursday 13 January 2022 the current Mayor of Worcester Councillor Stephen Hodgson joined volunteers to mark the end of the Worcester Charter 400 project by planting saplings in Perdiswell Playing Fields.

The Charter 400 team planted the 400 trees at Perdiswell as an environmental gift to Worcester. Tree planting brings a host of benefits from contributing to combating global warming as trees absorb carbon dioxide, removing and storing carbon while releasing oxygen back into the air to providing a canopy and a habitat for many species of wildlife; and of course, trees and woodlands bring people together acting as a landmark and encouraging pride in community spaces.

Cllr Stephen Hodgson, Mayor of Worcester, said: "What better gift to the city than to plant trees? I am delighted that we are able to mark the Charter 400 project with such a lasting legacy. It has been a personal honour to undertake the role of Mayor during such a historic and important year for Worcester, to remember and appreciate the importance of the Charter of King James I and to commemorate the city's very first Mayor, Edward Hurdman."

Adrian Gregson, Charter 400 Project Manager, added: "The Charter 400 project has been a real moment for us to celebrate Worcester's heritage as well as an opportunity to bring business, culture and communities together to look to the future and continue to navigate our way out of the pandemic.

"The Charter 400 project has featured artist and theatre commissions, opportunities to view the Charter of King James I itself, walking tours and much more. It is fitting that we end the Charter year with a gift to the city which we hope will last another 400 years."

The trees include oak seedlings grown from trees that are over 400 years old, in order to mark the year Worcester became a city. These 400-year-old trees can be found at sites around the city.

The planting is part of Worcester's participation in The Queen's Green Canopy project, a unique tree-planting initiative to mark Her Majesty's Platinum Jubilee in 2022 which invites people from across the United Kingdom to 'plant a tree for the Jubilee. The Vice Lord-Lieutenant of Worcestershire, Mrs Georgina Britten-Long, attended the planting to represent Worcester's Queen's Green Canopy team.

Charter 400 celebrates Worcester's rich heritage and culture, providing an opportunity to promote, encourage, enthuse, revitalise and boost local businesses which have been negatively impacted by the pandemic. The tree planting marks the end of the Charter 400 project.
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